Free Cinema 4D Model: Grammy Award

Grammy

Look, we both know you can’t sing but that shouldn’t stop you from getting a Grammy Award!  Fully lit, textured, and ready to render!  Includes an HDRI and name plate texture that can easily be edited in Photoshop.  This file is compatible with R12 & above and I also included an FBX, .3DS, Alembic, and .OBJ file for those with R11 and below or any other 3D software.  The OBJ format is After Effects and Element ready, so you can use this inside of After Effects using Cineware and with VideoCopilots’ “Element” plugin!

DOWNLOAD GRAMMY AWARD MODEL

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FLOW | A Mograph & VFX Process Part 04: Building the Composite in Nuke

flowTitleScreen

FLOW explores a workflow experienced in a real life motion graphics & visual effects project.  Artist Craig Whitaker will guest host this series along with myself and we will discuss both the “how” of getting through a project as well as the often more important, “why”.  We will begin at the early stages of art direction, script review and initial client requests. As we move through the project, various software techniques and choices will be explained and demonstrated – with the focus being on why each step of the project was completed in a certain fashion. Topics will include but are not limited to: art direction, addressing client demands and changes, matchmoving, when to get out of 3D, and much, much more.

Please enjoy Part 4 where Craig will pick up where EJ left off in Part 3 by taking the particle flow animation created in Cinema 4D and bringing the renders into Nuke.  First, we will look at some of the initial look development.  Then we will dive into how we can use fresnel passes as RGB passes to drive color and glow in composite.  We’ll follow that up by discussing how you can build an art direct-able script and we’ll wrap it all up by showing how you can work with tools such as Vector Blur, iDistort, and much more inside of Nuke.

Stay tuned for Part 05 where Craig will cover how he composited animations made in After Effects onto curved 3D panels inside Nuke.

Watch Part 1: The FLOW Project Overview

Watch Part 2: Tracking in Nuke

Watch Part 3: Creating the Particle Flow in Cinema 4D

Part 4:

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FLOW | A Mograph & VFX Process Part 03: Creating the Data Flow in Cinema 4D

flowTitleScreen

FLOW explores a workflow experienced in a real life motion graphics & visual effects project.  Artist Craig Whitaker will guest host this series along with myself and we will discuss both the “how” of getting through a project as well as the often more important, “why”.  We will begin at the early stages of art direction, script review and initial client requests. As we move through the project, various software techniques and choices will be explained and demonstrated – with the focus being on why each step of the project was completed in a certain fashion. Topics will include but are not limited to: art direction, addressing client demands and changes, matchmoving, when to get out of 3D, and much, much more.

Please enjoy Part 3 where we will take a look at how I created the data flow in Cinema 4D using the 3D tracking data Craig created in Nuke in Part 2.  First, we’ll go over the importance of using reference images to help open visual conversation with the client on pinning down an approved concept.  Then, we’ll look at some of the R&D we went through to come to a polished data flow style.  Finally, we will go over how to handle client feedback that can force you to scrap your original concept and how to stay on track despite large scale client changes.

Stay tuned for Part 04 where Craig will cover how he composited my Cinema 4D render into the shots by using Nuke.

Watch Part 1: The FLOW Project Overview

Watch Part 2: Tracking in Nuke

Part 3:

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Sports Elements Pack Vol. 01 for After Effects & Cinema 4D

sportsmodelpack

Introducing Sports Elements Pack Vol. 01, totally FREE!

My buddy Adam Schmisek (https://vimeo.com/schmisek | http://www.twitter.com/adamschmisek) & I collaborated on this pack of free sports elements. Included in Sports Pack Vol. 01 is a Cinema 4D jumbotron model as well as 2 customizable After Effects templates with the jumbrotron screen elements seen here in the jumbotron render. There’s a full HD & arena ribbon sized version that you can customize the text and colors of the animations easily!

Included in Sports Pack:

• Cinema 4D & OBJ format 3D Jumbotron Model
• 2 After Effects Text Transition Project Templates
• Basketball Arena HDRI

Download Sports Pack Vol. 01 here

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Free Cinema 4D Model: Laurel Wreath

Free Olive Wreath

You are all winners!  Here’s a free Laurel Wreath that is used to signify victory and achievement that you’ll probably recognize from it being used for many film awards such as Sundance.

This model is Mograph ready, so you’ll be able to easily animate on the individual leaves with effectors!  Materials are included.  This file is compatible with R12 & above and I also included an FBX, .3DS and an .OBJ file for those with R11 and below or any other 3D software.  And an added bonus, a C4D and OBJ format that is After Effects and Element ready, so you can use this inside of After Effects and with VideoCopilots’ “Element” plugin!

Download Laurel Wreath Model here.

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FLOW | A Mograph & VFX Process Part 02: Camera Tracking in Nuke

flowTitleScreen

FLOW explores a workflow experienced in a real life motion graphics & visual effects project.  Artist Craig Whitaker will guest host this series along with myself and we will discuss both the “how” of getting through a project as well as the often more important, “why”.  We will begin at the early stages of art direction, script review and initial client requests. As we move through the project, various software techniques and choices will be explained and demonstrated – with the focus being on why each step of the project was completed in a certain fashion. Topics will include but are not limited to: art direction, addressing client demands and changes, matchmoving, when to get out of 3D, and much, much more.

Please enjoy Part 2 where guest host Craig Whitaker Jr. will take a look at how to get a camera track inside of Nuke.  Then, he’ll uncover the problem spots you could run into and how to resolve them in order to refine the track.  Next, we’ll look at setting up cards in 3D space as well as exporting out a FBX camera for bringing in the camera data into Cinema 4D.  Finally, we will go over how you can place objects into the 3D scene space by utilizing the Point Cloud node.

Stay tuned for Part 03 where I will go over how to use the 3D tracking data Craig generated in Nuke in Part 02 & use it to create and place 3D elements using Cinema 4D for compositing into our footage.

Watch Part 1:  FLOW Project Overview

Watch Part 3:  Creating the Particle Flow in Cinema 4D

Part 2:

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Cinema 4D 101: Using Cappucino to Create Realtime Animation & Keyframe Reduction Techniques

In this new Cinema 4D 101 tutorial, I’ll be going over a more than likely untouched feature inside of Cinema 4D called Cappucino.  It’s mainly used in conjunction with character animating, so unless you do a lot of that, I’m sure the only cappucino you know is the hot, tasty kind.  But there are so many other useful uses for it!  So what does it do?  Cappucino is simply a method of recording mouse movement in your viewport and converts it to keyframe data.  Used creatively, it can be extremely useful!  In this tutorial I’ll be showing you multiple ways to use Cappucino to easily add movement to an object, create a “write-on” effect, and ability to keyframe dynamics simulations live and interactively in your scene as you the simulation play out.  I’ll also go over some simple keyframe reduction techniques.

Cinema 4D Quick Tip 04: Create a 2D Transparency Fade Effect on 3D Objects

When changing objects transparency using a Display Tag or using an effector, you’ll most likely run into the undesirable effect of the seeing unwanted parts of the 3D geometry being revealed when that transparency is adjusted.  Most of the time, the only way you’d think to get around this would be by rendering everything out and compositing and adjusting opacity in After Effects.  In this Quick Tip, I show you how you can avoid that and make your 3D geometry fade like it was a 2D object without revealing the unwanted parts of the object geometry.

See my previous quick tip on using effectors to fade on Motext referenced in this quick tip.

Example:

fix_trans_issues

Cinema 4D Holiday Ornament Shader Pack Vol. 2

Holiday Shader Pack Vol. 2

As a big “thank you” to you, the motion graphics community, I’ve updated my holiday ornament pack, now with even more goodness!  Volume 2 expands upon the very successful volume 1 pack released two years ago.

New in Volume 2:
• improved textures
• more than double the textures (over 50 now!)
• 3 new ornament types

Volume 2 Includes:
• a nicely lit scene file with four base ornament bulb models ready for texturing
• all the textures from volume 1, plus the new volume 2 textures all within the .lib4d

Download Cinema 4D Holiday Ornament Shader Pack Volume 2

To install, just place the .lib4d file into your “browser” folder, restart C4D and it should show up in your Content Browser.  You can mix and match colors and textures to produce hundreds of combinations of ornaments types!  Enjoy!

Screen Shot 2012-12-04 at 6.26.41 PM

Make sure to check out my free holiday model pack for Cinema 4D from a couple years ago below.  It has presents, ribbon bows, and Christmas lights!

Download Cinema 4D Holiday Model Pack

Holiday Pack Ornaments

Disclaimer:  There were a couple of these textures where Biomekk’s EnhanceC4D was used.   You’ll need to buy EnhanceC4D from Biomekk.com for a few of these textures to work.

Thanks to @ridvanmaloku from Plastic-Pistols.com for allowing me to use his tree model.  He did an awesome tutorial on how he made his Christmas tree using Cinema 4D’s Hair module.  Check it out here:  Tree Tutorial

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