How to Morph Between Splines in Cinema 4D

spline_morph

In this tutorial I’m going to show you a really cool workflow for morphing between splines using Cinema 4D.  This kind of spline morphing animation is awesome for using in conjunction your 2D workflow in After Effects by applying a Cel Shader material to your splines.  The nice thing about using the Cel Shader or just flat colors in the Luminance channel of your material is that when you use Cineware, these type of scenes render out super fast as a Cineware layer in After Effects because you’re not doing heavy shadow or shading calculations.  So to begin, I’ll go over the thinking behind the method I chose and how to achieve a nice, smooth spline morph.  Then, I’ll show you how I build a spline that is able to be affected by effectors to morph from one spline shape to another.  I’ll demonstrate how to use the Inheritance Effector to achieve this morph and ways to make your morph look super sexy and bouncy!  Finally, I’ll show you an alternate method of using MoSplines to morph and the shortcomings of going that route.

Here’s one of my previous tutorials that shows you how to create the 2D illustrative materials using the Cel Shader that I’m using for the objects in this tutorial:

Using the Cel Shader to Apply an Illustrative 2D Style to 3D Objects in C4D

And here’s the scene file I used in this tutorial that you guys can mess around with:

DOWNLOAD CINEMA 4D SCENE FILE

Tutorial:

If you want to learn more about how to use Cinema 4D in your 2D workflow, check out my Mixing 2D & 3D with Cinema 4D & After Effects Lynda.com course where I go over some creative ways to use the tools in C4D for a mainly 2D workflow inside of After Effects.

Stay up to date with the latest Cinema 4D tutorials by signing up to the Eyedesyn newsletter.

Essential Animation Tips for Cinema 4D: Layers

In this tutorial I’ll be covering one of the most overlooked features for organization and viewport speed optimization in Cinema 4D…LAYERS!  If you’ve never worked with them before, you will do yourself a disservice to not watch this and learn how much it can improve your workflow!  I’ll go over the basics of layers, how to add objects to layers, and then break down all of the aspects of each layer and how you can use it to your advantage and optimize your viewport speed to the fullest!

I was once someone who was ignorant of layers and never used them…man am I glad I learned about them!  Without Layers, some of my projects would be unworkable in Cinema 4D’s bogged down viewport.

Watch the Tutorial:

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Essential Animation Quick Tips for Cinema 4D

In this tutorial I’ll be sharing some quick tips to help you be a better animator in Cinema 4D. For those of you coming from After Effects, I’ll relate some of the important animation techniques you probably use very often in After Effects and how they can be done in Cinema 4D.

Topics covered in this tutorial are:

Gimbal Lock: What It Is & How to Avoid It
Quaternion Expression
Overdub
Align to Path Tag
Creating “Roving Keyframes” with the Constant Velocity Function
How to Loop/Repeat a Set of Keyframes

Hopefully after watching these quick tips, it’ll help you be a better animator in your day to day workflow!

Watch the Tutorial:

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Essential Animation Tips for Cinema 4D: The Timeline

In this tutorial I’ll be covering a bunch of helpful functions, features, and shortcut keys to enable you to be more efficient when animating and working in the timeline in Cinema 4D. A few of the topics that are covered in this tutorial are:

• Show and Hide menus to isolate object animation tracks
• Timeline Link View Options
• Folding Options
• Using View Filters to Show/Hide Specific Types of Animation Tracks
• Using the F-Curve Mode
• Numerous useful keyboard shortcuts

These are some of the features I use everyday that streamline my workflow and increase my productivity and I feel are important for any level of Cinema 4D artist to know!

Download My Custom Animation Layout

Tutorial:

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Using the Pose Morph Tag to Morph Between Objects in Cinema 4D

In this tutorial I’m going to show you a really cool workflow for animating or morphing between 2D style, illustrative objects using Cinema 4D.  First, we will start by going over things to consider when designing your objects to achieve a nice morph.  Then, I’ll introduce you to a super powerful feature that is normally reserved for character animation, the Pose Morph tag.  I’ll demonstrate how to use the Pose Morph tag creatively and show how easy it is to record object states and then animate through the poses by simply keyframing sliders.  Finally, I’ll show you how to add some overshoot to the morph animation to give it a nice organic bounce effect.

Here’s one of my previous tutorials that shows you how to create the 2D illustrative materials using the Cel Shader that I’m using for the objects in this tutorial:

Using the Cel Shader to Apply an Illustrative 2D Style to 3D Objects in C4D

And here’s the scene file I used in this tutorial that you guys can mess around with:

DOWNLOAD CINEMA 4D SCENE FILE

Tutorial:

If you want to learn more about how to use Cinema 4D in your 2D workflow, check out my Mixing 2D & 3D with Cinema 4D & After Effects Lynda.com course where I go over some creative ways to use the tools in C4D for a mainly 2D workflow inside of After Effects.

Stay up to date with the latest Cinema 4D tutorials by signing up to the Eyedesyn newsletter.

Creating an Illustrative 2D Style Ribbon in Cinema 4D

In this tutorial I’m going to keep with the nice, 2D illustrative look theme and apply it to create those popular and trendy 2D style ribbon banners with 3D depth by using Cinema 4D.  I’ll start by showing you how to use C4D’s Spline Wrap to create our ribbon along with some handy tips to sell that 2D illustrative look.  Then, to get the flat 2D color, we’ll use materials created by the Cel Shader & Spline Shader.   Finally, I’ll show you some creative ways to animate the ribbon to give it some nice organic movement.   You’ll even learn some Latin!  This tutorial has it all, huh?  Again when working with Cinema 4D to create 2D vector looking art, be sure when you render to turn up the Anti-Aliasing settings as well as using a sharper Filter than Animation; such as Cubic (Still Image) or Sync so you have nice crisp edges in your animation to sell the 2D style.

Here’s the tutorials I mention in this video that shows you how to create the 2D illustrative materials using the Cel Shader as well as the text material using a Spline Shader that is applied on the ribbon element:

Using the Cel Shader to Apply an Illustrative 2D Style to 3D Objects in C4D

Using the Spline Shader in C4D to Create Text as a Material

And here’s the scene file I used in this tutorial that you guys can mess around with:

DOWNLOAD CINEMA 4D SCENE FILE

Tutorial:

If you want to learn more about how to use Cinema 4D in your 2D workflow, check out my Mixing 2D & 3D with Cinema 4D & After Effects Lynda.com course where I go over some creative ways to use the tools in C4D for a mainly 2D workflow inside of After Effects.

Stay up to date with the latest Cinema 4D tutorials by signing up to the Eyedesyn newsletter.

Using the Cel Shader to Apply an Illustrative 2D Style to 3D Objects in Cinema 4D

Since presenting for MAXON at NAB 2014, I’ve received a bunch of requests asking me to go further in depth on how I used the Cel Shader in a client spot in my presentation.  In this tutorial, I’ll show you just that:  how to create and apply a cool, stylistic, flat, illustrative 2D look to 3D objects in Cinema 4D. We will achieve this look by using the often overlooked Cel Shader & Spline Shader. Learning how to leverage C4D in your 2D workflow is critical when it comes to saving time creating elements and animating. If you’ve ever tried to make something look 3D with 2D objects, you know how painstaking it can be to sell the 3D depth using flat layers.  I’ll also show how you can use the Cel Shader to apply shadows to objects with 100% luminance.  One final note, be sure when you render to turn up the Anti-Aliasing settings as well as using a sharper Filter than Animation; such as Cubic (Still Image) or Sync so you have nice crisp edges in your animation to sell the 2D style.

Here’s the tutorial I mention in this video that shows you how to create the text material using a Spline Shader that is applied on the ribbon element:

Using the Spline Shader in C4D to Create Text as a Material

And here’s my MAXON NAB 2014 Presentation where I go over many ways to use Cinema 4D in a 2D workflow:

My MAXON NAB 2014 Presentation

And here’s the scene file I used in this tutorial that you guys can mess around with:

DOWNLOAD CINEMA 4D SCENE FILE

Tutorial:

If you want to learn more about how to use Cinema 4D in your 2D workflow, check out my Mixing 2D & 3D with Cinema 4D & After Effects Lynda.com course where I go over some creative ways to use the tools in C4D for a mainly 2D workflow inside of After Effects.

Stay up to date with the latest Cinema 4D tutorials by signing up to the Eyedesyn newsletter.