Using the Pose Morph Tag to Morph Between Objects in Cinema 4D

In this tutorial I’m going to show you a really cool workflow for animating or morphing between 2D style, illustrative objects using Cinema 4D.  First, we will start by going over things to consider when designing your objects to achieve a nice morph.  Then, I’ll introduce you to a super powerful feature that is normally reserved for character animation, the Pose Morph tag.  I’ll demonstrate how to use the Pose Morph tag creatively and show how easy it is to record object states and then animate through the poses by simply keyframing sliders.  Finally, I’ll show you how to add some overshoot to the morph animation to give it a nice organic bounce effect.

Here’s one of my previous tutorials that shows you how to create the 2D illustrative materials using the Cel Shader that I’m using for the objects in this tutorial:

Using the Cel Shader to Apply an Illustrative 2D Style to 3D Objects in C4D

And here’s the scene file I used in this tutorial that you guys can mess around with:

DOWNLOAD CINEMA 4D SCENE FILE

Tutorial:

If you want to learn more about how to use Cinema 4D in your 2D workflow, check out my Mixing 2D & 3D with Cinema 4D & After Effects Lynda.com course where I go over some creative ways to use the tools in C4D for a mainly 2D workflow inside of After Effects.

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Create a Wavy Band Surface in Cinema 4D

Preview:

In this tutorial, I’ll walk you through the technique I came up with to recreate the nice, clean undulating bands in these spots:

RocknRoller Studios for The Sound of Deep House

WeAreSeventeen for Betfair

I’ll start off by showing you my thought process and my first two failed attempts and see how I finally came to discover how to recreate this look. Cinema 4D has an amazing amount of useful tools and I had to think outside of the box (or cube) to figure this one out!  The technique I demonstrate in this tutorial can be applied to many styles of mograph and hopefully helps you think out of the box next time you become stuck trying to figure out a technique!

UPDATE:  I’ve had a few Twitter buddies share their alternate methods of recreating this look that are very interesting; there’s no one way to do things!   Here are all the project files, including my project file using the method I demo’d in this tutorial.

Watch the Tutorial:

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Creating an Illustrative 2D Style Ribbon in Cinema 4D

In this tutorial I’m going to keep with the nice, 2D illustrative look theme and apply it to create those popular and trendy 2D style ribbon banners with 3D depth by using Cinema 4D.  I’ll start by showing you how to use C4D’s Spline Wrap to create our ribbon along with some handy tips to sell that 2D illustrative look.  Then, to get the flat 2D color, we’ll use materials created by the Cel Shader & Spline Shader.   Finally, I’ll show you some creative ways to animate the ribbon to give it some nice organic movement.   You’ll even learn some Latin!  This tutorial has it all, huh?  Again when working with Cinema 4D to create 2D vector looking art, be sure when you render to turn up the Anti-Aliasing settings as well as using a sharper Filter than Animation; such as Cubic (Still Image) or Sync so you have nice crisp edges in your animation to sell the 2D style.

Here’s the tutorials I mention in this video that shows you how to create the 2D illustrative materials using the Cel Shader as well as the text material using a Spline Shader that is applied on the ribbon element:

Using the Cel Shader to Apply an Illustrative 2D Style to 3D Objects in C4D

Using the Spline Shader in C4D to Create Text as a Material

And here’s the scene file I used in this tutorial that you guys can mess around with:

DOWNLOAD CINEMA 4D SCENE FILE

Tutorial:

If you want to learn more about how to use Cinema 4D in your 2D workflow, check out my Mixing 2D & 3D with Cinema 4D & After Effects Lynda.com course where I go over some creative ways to use the tools in C4D for a mainly 2D workflow inside of After Effects.

Stay up to date with the latest Cinema 4D tutorials by signing up to the Eyedesyn newsletter.

Using the Cel Shader to Apply an Illustrative 2D Style to 3D Objects in Cinema 4D

Since presenting for MAXON at NAB 2014, I’ve received a bunch of requests asking me to go further in depth on how I used the Cel Shader in a client spot in my presentation.  In this tutorial, I’ll show you just that:  how to create and apply a cool, stylistic, flat, illustrative 2D look to 3D objects in Cinema 4D. We will achieve this look by using the often overlooked Cel Shader & Spline Shader. Learning how to leverage C4D in your 2D workflow is critical when it comes to saving time creating elements and animating. If you’ve ever tried to make something look 3D with 2D objects, you know how painstaking it can be to sell the 3D depth using flat layers.  I’ll also show how you can use the Cel Shader to apply shadows to objects with 100% luminance.  One final note, be sure when you render to turn up the Anti-Aliasing settings as well as using a sharper Filter than Animation; such as Cubic (Still Image) or Sync so you have nice crisp edges in your animation to sell the 2D style.

Here’s the tutorial I mention in this video that shows you how to create the text material using a Spline Shader that is applied on the ribbon element:

Using the Spline Shader in C4D to Create Text as a Material

And here’s my MAXON NAB 2014 Presentation where I go over many ways to use Cinema 4D in a 2D workflow:

My MAXON NAB 2014 Presentation

And here’s the scene file I used in this tutorial that you guys can mess around with:

DOWNLOAD CINEMA 4D SCENE FILE

Tutorial:

If you want to learn more about how to use Cinema 4D in your 2D workflow, check out my Mixing 2D & 3D with Cinema 4D & After Effects Lynda.com course where I go over some creative ways to use the tools in C4D for a mainly 2D workflow inside of After Effects.

Stay up to date with the latest Cinema 4D tutorials by signing up to the Eyedesyn newsletter.

Cinema 4D Quick Tip: Using an Area Light’s Built-In Softbox Option

softbox_template_horiz

In this Cinema 4D Quick Tip I’ll uncover a useful feature that turns your Area Light into a softbox shape that shows up in your objects reflections.  I’ll then elaborate and show you some examples of interesting ways to use the Area Lights shape visibility settings to add some nice reflections to your objects.

Tutorial:

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Cinema 4D Quick Tip: Creatively Using Dynamics for 2D Style Animation

dynamics

In this Cinema 4D quick tip I’ll go over how you can utilize Cinema 4D’s Dynamics & Cineware creatively to spice up your 2D animations by applying real world physics to them.  To get real world physics to be applied to your 2D animations, you either need to painstakingly keyframe it by hand or buy an expensive plug-in for After Effects, not to mention taking the time to learn it!  But for those of us that have Cinema 4D, you can use it as a “plug-in” and apply dynamics to your 2D style objects in Cinema 4D and easily bring them into After Effects via Cineware.  Check out the link below to see a free excerpt from my Lynda.com course on Mixing 2D and 3D with After Effects and CINEMA 4D.

Watch Tutorial

You can also view the rest of my Cinema 4D courses on Lynda.com here.

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Using the Spline Shader to Create Text as a Material in Cinema 4D

Spline Shader

In this quick tip I’ll show you how to totally bypass Photoshop and create 2D text materials and apply to 3D objects as textures by using Cinema 4D’s Spline Shader.  Using the Spline Shader you can use text as simply as a 2D resolution independent material, or get creative and use is in the bump or displacement channels of a material to get some embossed or stamped metal looks. The Spline Shader also isn’t limited to just text, you can use any spline shape to create a texture!

Tutorial:

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Cinema 4D Quick Tip: Using PSR Constraint Tag Targets

PSR Constraint

In this Cinema 4D quick tip I’ll go over a useful option when doing character animation, Constraint Tags.  Specifically, I’ll be demonstrating how to use the PSR Target option to be able to morph an object from one target to another.  For example, this can come in handy when you have a character picking up an object or placing it down, this option allows you to morph between the grasp of the character and the final placement of the object.  Check out the link below to see a free excerpt from my Lynda.com course on rigging a robot arm and find out more about using PSR Constraint Tag Targets.

Watch Tutorial

You can also view the rest of my Cinema 4D courses on Lynda.com here.

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Cinema 4D Quick Tip: Freeze Transformation

freeze_trans

In this Cinema 4D quick tip I’ll go over an option that you see a ton but might not know what it does, Freeze Transformation.  Freeze Transformation is very useful when doing character animation as well as other workflows.  Check out the link below to see a free excerpt from my Lynda.com course on rigging a robot arm and find out more about the Freeze Transformation option.

Watch Tutorial

You can also view the rest of my Cinema 4D courses on Lynda.com here.

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Using the Align to Spline Tag with Xpresso in Cinema 4D

Using the Align to Spline Tag w/ Xpresso

In this tutorial I’m going to cover some awesome time saving tips when using Cinema 4D’s ‘Align to Spline’ tag or splines in general. I’ll go over how to get objects to align & animate with the tips of an object created by a SweepNURB or a SplineWrap Deformer as one would when creating such things as a power cord with a plug, or a headphone cord with a headphone jack, or any abstract animation where you need an object to move perfectly with the movement/growth of the SweepNURB. I’ll demonstrate how this can be done by simply changing the way the intermediate spline points are interpolated. I’ll then show you a way to use a simple XPresso setup to have total control over the entire SweepNURB growth/object tip rig to animate by adjusting just one parameter.

In the second part of this tutorial, I’ll go over the same concepts only this time I’ll show you how you can use it with a SplineWrap deformer’s offset and use an example of how you can get a Light Object to align to the tip of a light streak so you can composite a lens flare or particles at the front tip of the light streak in After Effects. We’ll also do this by using an Align to Spline tag and a bit more complex Xpresso. Enjoy!

Tutorial:

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